Recipes that are delicious and that always work!

You know these recipes are delicious because if I didn't think that they were fabulous . . . I wouldn't be showing them to you. You can also be sure that these recipes work for the same reason! The rest is simply a matter of taste.
I cannot endure to waste anything so precious as autumnal sunshine by staying in the house. So I have spent almost all the daylight hours in the open air.
~Nathaniel Hawthorne

Sunday, 25 October 2009

Brown Sugar and Butter Glazed Parsnips




Parsnips wasn't something that we really ate much of when I was growing up. My mom hated them. I remember her cooking them once, lightly boiled and then sliced and fried in butter. She wanted to see if her dislike for them had diminished.



It hadn't.



I loved them though, and I still do. (I know . . . what don't I love??? Well snails for one . . . and squid, but I digress.)



Parsnips.
They give soups and stews incredible flavour.



Mixed with cooked potatoes and carrots, they make lovely root vegetable mash.

Roasted in goosefat, and then glazed with honey, they are my favourite part of our Christmas dinner.



Boiled, and then glazed in brown sugar and butter, with a bit of nutmeg . . .

They make any dinner feel like Christmas.

I could eat a whole plate of these . . . and nothing else at all.



*Brown Sugar and Butter Glazed Parsnips*
Serves 4
Printable Recipe

Crispy tender parsnips glazed with butter, brown sugar and nutmeg. Delicious!!

1 pound parsnips, peeled and sliced in half
(If they are very large cut out the woody core and discard, cut into quarters)
2 TBS butter
2 TBS soft light brown sugar
salt and pepper
freshly grated nutmeg

Place the parsnips into a pot of lightly salted water and bring to the boil. Cook, just until crispy tender, 4 to 5 minutes. Drain well. Melt the butter and brown sugar together in a large skillet. Add the parsnips and season to taste with some salt, pepper and freshly grated nutmeg. Cook, stirring gently until the parsnips are lightly browned and glazed.

9 comments:

Chele said...

I love glazed parsnips too - there is nothing better in my mind! These will be making an appearance at our xmas feast ;0)

Julie said...

Hi Marie! I'm up late & just saw your kind comment on my blog--thank-you!

Suddenly, I'm having a huge craving for some parsnips--guess what I'll be getting at the market on Monday??? Think I'll be using this recipe for Thanksgiving dinner--I'm hosting this year. I can tell I'm going to love visiting you for inspiration!

Jan said...

Great recipe for parsnips. I can't be doing with snails either Marie!

rachel said...

I love roasted parsnips. But my early experience was of them grated, possibly raw or steamed - revolting either way - at boarding school. We would employ a tried and tested solution, namely taking a used envelope into supper with us, to smuggle the hated stuff out in our gymslip pockets, to throw away later. Yes, I am very old.... I pre-date plastic bags....

Sylvie said...

I do like snails and squid, but not as much as I like parsnips. Lovely.

Gloria said...

Marie, this look really nice, ! Have a nice week, huggs! gloria

Wackyanne said...

Hello Mom-in-Law :) I still have some parsnips (one-and-a-half bags' worth, left over from Thanksgiving of all things) to enjoy over the next few days. Anthony and I are planning some beef stew, so maybe we'll toss some in there. However, my favourite way to have them has always been roasted with butter and sugar. I only got them with Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner when I was a kid, so they were a real treat for me (Brussel Sprouts too!). They are always a part of our own big celebration dinners now that we are adults, but Anthony is not as obsessed as I am for sure. One difference between us, is that I prefer them well-scrubbed to peeled. The better quality the parsnip (or carrot for that matter), the better the overall taste. I love the nuttiness and coziness of this vegetable, and even managed to get our lil' guy to try them this time around.
I've not bothered taking out the woody core before, but will try that with the large remaining ones. I know that every once in a while the parsnips may turn out a bit bitter, but am not sure what exactly causes that. Sadly, it almost certainly happens when they get cold, meaning they don't make the best leftovers with next day's turkey fixings. Or at least I found it so this year.

thedoglady said...

Thanks to you and Finest Foodies Friday I've added parsnips to my grocery list! Thanks for debunking English food. Mom went back to her roots years ago and made prime rib and yorkshire pudding for Christmas, topped off with mincemeat tarts for dessert. Yum! Thanks for blogging! dee@cookingwithdee.net

Helene said...

I'll have to try this. Probably would be good with carrots also.