Recipes that are delicious and that always work!

You know these recipes are delicious because if I didn't think that they were fabulous . . . I wouldn't be showing them to you. You can also be sure that these recipes work for the same reason! The rest is simply a matter of taste.

Thursday, 24 June 2010

Fudge Brownie Pie



I was sitting here today and I thought to myself . . . I want something scrummy . . . something rich . . . something chocolatey. And then I thought . . . what if I bake my favourite brownies, in a tart pan and then cover them with marshmallows and a fudge frosting . . . I wonder what it would taste like

I have only three words for you.

OH - - - MY - - - GOODNESS!!!


 



Have you ever eaten anything so incredibly scrummy that the very first bite sent you into spasms of delight . . .



so incredibly moreish that you can't utter any words . . . only sounds . . .

Sounds like . . . . mmmmmm . . . . ooooooohhh . . . . nnnngggghhh . . . .

and in between . . . . only the sounds of your fork hitting the plate . . . again and again????



Imagine a fudgy mouthful of rich moist chocolate brownie . . . stuffed with toasted pecans and then topped with oooey, goooey, sweet marshmallow . . . all smoothed over with a rich chocolate fudge frosting.



Yes . . . this is heaven in every bite. Okay, so this has been a bit more than three words . . . but well, I am sure you'll forgive me.



Now, go make this NOW!




*Fudge Brownie Pie*
Makes one 9 inch pie
Printable Recipe

Delicious fudgy brownie bottom topped with marshmallow and a tasty chocolate fudge icing. Gorgeous!

105g of flour
(3/4 cup)
200g of caster sugar
(1 cup)
1 ounce of unsweetened cocoa powder, sifted
(1/4 cup)
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
4 ounces butter, melted
2 large free range eggs, beaten
2 tsp vanilla
60g of chopped toasted pecans (1/2 cup)
2 handfuls of mini marshmallows
For the frosting:
2 ounces butter, melted
(1/4 cup)
1 ounce cocoa powder, sifted
(1/4 cup)
2 ounces evaporated milk
(1/4 cup)
8 ounces icing sugar, sifted

Preheat the oven to 180*C/350*F/ gas mark 4. Butter a 9 inch flan pan with a removeable bottom well and then set aside.

Whisk together the flour, sugar, cocoa powder, baking powder and salt in a bowl. Beat together the butter, eggs and vanilla. Add to the dry ingredients and mix until smooth. Stir in the toasted nuts. Pour into the prepared pan. Bake on a middle shelf of the oven for 25 to 30 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the centre comes out clean. Immediately sprinkle the marshmallows on top and return to the oven for a few minutes to melt the marshmallows. Remove from the oven and carefully spread the chocolate frosting over top.

To make the chocolate frosting mix all ingredients together in a bowl, beating with an eletric whisk until smooth and thick. Spread on the hot marshmallows.
Let cool completely. Cut into wedges to serve.

53 comments:

  1. Okay Marie. It's 11:40 p.m. here and I'm running around my kitchen looking for marshmallows for tomorrow! You really must stop doing this to me-OMG! I'll need to make 2
    xoxo Pattie

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  2. Hi, Marie. I noticed that you and I posted very similar sounding recipes today, but my "hot fudge pie" is the light (or "lite" - ugh) version of your definitely richer and "scrummy" rendition! The coincidence amused me tonight....

    I enjoy dropping by to learn more about English cookery. Keep up the good work!!



    Thanks,

    Dan

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  3. This sounds a real rich treat Marie,though as I have said before,I am not a choco fan,but I know someone who would devour the lot in an instance He-He.Shhhhh his name is(The Rooster) LOL!!Have a lovely day I hope you enjoyed yesterday.Take Care God Bless Kath xx

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  4. Esto se ve delicioso, es una verdadera tentanciĆ³n. Un saludo

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  5. And what about poor Todd? Was he forced to sit and watch you eat that "vile" chocolate while he drooled in anticipation of something scrummy for him? And did you have to sacrifice yourself and eat the whole pan?

    Poor Todd! Poor Marie!

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  6. Ooo... sooo decadent, sooo good, Marie! This is wonderful! Happy Day, my friend--LOVE YOU ((BIG HUGS))

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  7. Oh My Giddy Aunt!! You are a Very Bad Girl Marie!! That is Soooooooooo Naughty!!!

    Thank You;)

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  8. oh boy...i am making this for the 4th of july! thanks for the recipe!

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  9. GASP! Sigh and closely followed by another gasp!
    Wow, what an amazing treat. Think I have gained weight just looking at the pictures but I defo want to make this pie!!!

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  10. MMMMMMMMMMMMMM, my favorite!!!

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  11. Talk about pure temptation!?! Oh, my!!

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  12. I don't like marshmallows, but this sounds delicious!! Do you think I could substitute with caramel sauce? Thanks.

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  13. Hi Paula. I believe in eating what you love and in pushing the boundaries a bit. If marshmallows are not your thing by all means top with a caramel sauce. You won't be able to spread the icing over a caramel sauce however, but you could frost them with the chocolate cover first and then drizzle with the caramel sauce. My, that sounds fabulous! I'd add some chopped toasted pecans or walnuts too! Scrummo!!

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  14. Hi, I LOVE Mississippi Mud Cake. It was my favorite dessert that Mom made when I was a kid. She learned how to make it from my grandmother. A classic recipe that's been around for 60+ years and will never grow old.

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  15. Yeah,this pretty much is a variation on the theme of Mississippi cake/pie. But it certainly got my attention!

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  16. I don't have access to castor sugar, can I use regular (American) granulated sugar?

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  17. Absolutely Coleen. It measures the same. I normally use the castor for baking, ut granulated works much the same. CStor works in a bit quicker, and melts quicker be Use it is fine. You could process some granulated in a food processor to make it finer too. That's all castor sugar is, very fine sugar. Hope this helps.

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  18. Absolutely Coleen. It measures the same. I normally use the castor for baking, ut granulated works much the same. CStor works in a bit quicker, and melts quicker be Use it is fine. You could process some granulated in a food processor to make it finer too. That's all castor sugar is, very fine sugar. Hope this helps.

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  19. Can a springform pan be used instead of a flan pan?

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  20. Absolutely Rosemary. Any pan which will allow you to release the sides easily and which is the right diameter will work!

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  21. Looks delicious! One question though, if using a springform pan, at what point would I take the sides and bottom off?

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  22. Hi Bob, thanks for your question. I would let it sit in the pan for ten minutes before removing the sides. I would let it cool completely before removing the bottom. Hope this helps!

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  23. Thanks you so much for this recipe!! It was a hit yesterday served with homemade ice cream!! The spring form pan worked great. I let it cool completely, ran a knife around the top and it popped right out!

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  24. Thanks you so much for this recipe!! It was a hit yesterday served with homemade ice cream!! The spring form pan worked great. I let it cool completely, ran a knife around the top and it popped right out!

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  25. Am I supposed to spread the marshmallows after I take it out of the oven? And does the chocolate frosting need to be mixed with the electric mixer rather than just by hand? I made this and it looks different from yours, but I'm sure it will still be delicious.

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  26. Bobbie, if you read the recipe you will see where I tell you to top it with the marshmallows as soon as you take it from the oven and then return it for a few minutes. I also tell you to beat the frosting ingredients together with an electric whisk, which is an electric mixer. We call it an electric whisk over here. Hope this clarifies things for you.

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  27. Sounds delicious!! I've never heard of icing sugar but I'm assuming it is the same as confectioners sugar, is that correct? Thanks for sharing!

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  28. Yes Tracey, it is confectioner's sugar. I hope you make it and enjoy it as much as we do.

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  29. Sounds like the perfect treat for a snow day! Which, happily, would be today :-)

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  30. Sounds like a perfect recipe for a storm day here in Canada...which, happily, is today for me. I just hope i still have those marshmallows in the cupboard!

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  31. Replies
    1. Hey Marie. Just about to bake this up...finally got some marshmallows :-).Is the butter in the recipe salted or no? Hoping you say yes...i forgot to pick up unsalted butter lol

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  32. I hope that you like it Jenn! Want my honest opinion of unsalted butter? I don't think it really makes a heck of a lot of difference to be honest. If you use a really good quality like Lurpak, the salt is almost neglible.

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  33. I've made this recipe twice now and it was an instant hit with both audiences! Amazing! I already had all of the ingredients in the house, and it's so quick and easy to make! (That's dangerous because now we could probably have it just about anytime we want... ;) Thanks! New family favorite!

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  34. Whitney, thank you so much for stopping by to let us know you are enjoying this recipe along with your family! You made my day! xx

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  35. this looks to die for, add a couple of teaspoons of almond to the frosting and it's perfect icing.

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  36. I added two teaspoons of almond extract to the icing and it's so delicious.

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  37. So glad you enjoyed Annette!! It is pretty good if I don't say so myself. Love your addition! Thanks for sharing with us! xx

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  38. This reminds me of the Mississippi Mud Pie my Mom & one of her friends used to make for us when we came to visit. I haven't seen a recipe quite like it but this sounds alot like it and even easier to make! Thanks for sharing, I feel the need to try it! :)

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  39. I hope that you do try it Pati, and that when you do you love it as much as we do! xx

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  40. Hi, thanks so much for this recipe!! Do you think it will freeze well?

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  41. Hi Leah, you're welcome. I have to be honest here and say I have never frozen it. There has never been any left to freeze. I am not sure about the toppings, if they would freeze al-right or not. You could freeze a little sliver of it and see how that works, and if it comes out OK, then there is your answer! Come back and let us know so I can amend the recipe if you have or don't have success!

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  42. i have a pan with a removable bottom but the sides are very shallow, do you think that will work? How tall do you think the sides need to be?

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  43. Hi Leah, my pan has three inch sides, and it probably came half way up them at least. A spring form cake tin would work, or you could bake it in a nine inch square tin with deep sides, lining it with baking paper that has an overhang and just lift it out with the baking paper after letting it cool in the pan for ten minutes.

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  44. what is icing sugar this is for the frosting. do you have to add the pecans

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  45. what is icing sugar for the frosting. do you have to add pecans

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  46. Hi Doris, icing sugar is confectioners sugar or powdered sugar. The nuts go into the base batter, where it says stir in the nuts. Hope this helps.

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  47. PS - If you don't like pecans or are allergic to nuts, by all means leave them out! It won't change anything.

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  48. I don't know if anyone else had this problem, but my mini-marshmallows wouldn't melt enought to spread. I tried spreading once after they were in the oven awhile, but it wouldn't spread much, just a tiny layer on the cake part and globs of unmelted marshmallows. I put in the oven for a while longer and the same thing... I kept trying to spread it but it stuck to the cake and cake was coming up. I couldn't even get it off of my spatula without using another spatula. So, I left it as is and spread on the icing. Next time I will definitely use marshmallow creme. Some of my guests will have a bite with a glob of marshmallows in it and some of them won't have any. Ugh!

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  49. Not sure why you had this problem Joy! As you can see from my photos they melted really nicely on mine. Perhaps you didn't leave them long enough? Or maybe marshmallows are different in American than they are over here??

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  50. What's icing sugar? And what's caster sugar. And where can you get these ingredients at?

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  51. Michelle, Icing sugar is powdered sugar. The type you would use to make icing with. Caster sugar is a fine granulated sugar. White sugar. You can just use that. I use caster sugar because the granulated sugar over here is a bit coarser than the granulated sugar in North America and blends easier. Hope this helps!

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