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Caramel Apple Self-Saucing Pudding



Growing up it was a real treat if my mom bought a box of Pudding Cake mix.  It was like magic. Everything was beaten together, spread in a pan and like magic, it baked a cake with a lush thick sauce on the bottom.


It came in a few different flavours. We weren't picky. We'd eat them all.  Dessert wasn't something we had very often when I was growing up. We might have a scoop of ice cream after supper on Friday night, and maybe on Sundays we would have ice cream with some tinned fruit on top, or our favourite . . . strawberry jam spooned over.


Other than that we got cake on our birthday (and ice cream), dessert at Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter and when we had company for dinner, which wasn't very often.


Occasionally though, mom would let us have the treat of something like a pudding cake on Saturday night.  She had been overweight as a child and so was very careful about what we ate.



Here in the UK another name for dessert is Pudding.  In fact all desserts are called pudding, not to be confused with pudding in North America, which is a thick custard type of dessert that is cooked on top of the stove.



I can remember being asked in a restaurant not too soon after I moved over here, after Todd and I had gotten married, did we want any pudding.  I thought to myself . . .  hmm . . .  I didn't see any on the menu, so I asked the waitress, did they have butterscotch, which is my favourite.


She looked at me like I was from another planet!  Todd explained that pudding was what dessert was called over here and it came in the shape of cakes, pies, bakes and puddings!  Usually slathered with additional lashings of custard sauce or pouring cream, or  . . . shudder . . .  both!!!


And it didn't stop there.  Even ice cream was called pudding.  Because Pudding was a course and not a dish.  Does that make sense?  I hope so.


Anyways, this is a Pudding that is actually a Pudding! haha  A tasty cake pudding that makes its own sauce and it blows those pudding cakes from my childhood right out of the water.


What you end up with is a lush maple flavoured sauce, topped with a maple and apple cake, filled with chunks of sweet/tart Granny Smith apples.


Make sure you don't leave the apple in too big a chunks or they won't cook all the way through.  You want it chopped coarsely, but medium to small coarse.



The sauce is a mix of maple syrup, brown sugar, butter and boiling water which gets poured on top of the cake in the baking tin. Don't mix the cake or the syrup together no matter what.  They are meant to be cake and liquid on top. Make sure your dish is deep enough or the sauce may boil over.


Like magic when it bakes it forms a fluffy cake on top and a lush sauce underneath.  Perfect spooned into bowls and served warm with some whipped cream or vanilla ice cream, or yes . . .  Todd's favourite, custard. Delicious!

Yield: 6
Author:

Caramel Apple Self-Saucing Pudding

Caramel Apple Self-Saucing Pudding

A delicious apple filled pudding that sauces itself.  Serve warm with whipped cream or ice cream on top!

ingredients:

For the cake:
  • 175g self rising flour (1  1/4 cup)
  • 50g soft light brown sugar (1/4 cup)
  • 100g melted butter (scant half cup, 7 TBS)
  • 1 large free range egg, lightly beaten
  • 120ml milk (1/2 cup)
  • 60ml maple syrup (1/4 cup)
  • 1 granny smith apple, peeled and coarsely chopped
For the Topping:
  • 240ml maple syrup (1 cup)
  • 200g soft light brown sugar (1 cup, packed)
  • 240ml boiling water (1 cup)
  • 60g butter (1/4 cup)
  • (cinnamon sugar garnish optional)

instructions:

How to cook Caramel Apple Self-Saucing Pudding

  1. Preheat the oven to 180*C/350*F/ gas mark 4.  Butter a six cup deep baking dish. Set aside.
  2. Whisk together the flour and sugar for the cake part.  Whisk together the melted butter, egg, milk and maple syrup. Stir the wet mixture into the dry mixture.  Whisk together to combine. Stir in the apple and spread into the baking dish.
  3. Put all of the ingredients for the topping together in a saucepan. Bring just to the boil stirring to melt the sugar.  Pour evenly over top of the batter in the baking dish. Do NOT stir to mix together.  Bake in the preheated oven for 40 to 45 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. The liquid mixture will have sunk to the bottom creating a sauce.
  4. Dust with cinnamon sugar and serve warm, spooned into bowls and topped with whipped cream or ice cream if desired.

NOTES:

Make sure you cut the apple into smallish chunks or it may not cook through.  You may find grating it works better.

Did you make this recipe?
Tag @marierayner5530 on instagram and hashtag it #EnglishKitchen
Created using The Recipes Generator



This would make a fabulous dessert alternative for the holidays, rather than pumpkin pie, or Christmas pudding.   Simple and very delicious! 



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Marie Rayner
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10 comments:

  1. I think I enjoy reading your thoughts and memories on your posts almost as much as the recipe. This is such a tummy-warming dessert. ~Elaine

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aww, thanks so much Elaine! That made me smile! xoxo

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  2. Oh have mercy, this looks splendid.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh my, this looks so good! We had those self-saucing puddings when I was growing up too. But I like to make my own from scratch. I definitely want to make this one. If one doesn't have self rising flour, how much baking powder or soda would one use in this recipe?
    My hubby and I went out for dinner today to a little out of the way restaurant. The owners are from east London and moved here in the past year. I thought of you when the mister was taking our order because he is from Britain and everything is home made. They had some English dishes on the menu including a real English breakfast which we will have to go back soon and indulge in. It was lovely talking to him and I loved his accent!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can make your own Self-rising flour very easily Sandi!

      Make Your Own Self Raising Flour:
      You can make your own self raising flour by adding 1 1/2 tsp of baking powder and 1/4 tsp of salt to every cup of plain flour.

      Your restaurant experience sounds lovely. I do hope you go back for the Full Breakfast! My husband and I haven't been out for one in a while. Time to rectify that! xoxo

      Delete
  4. Thank you so much, Marie. Can't wait to make this pudding! Have a lovely day!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Marie. What are the measurements of the pan you used? Some pans are smaller and deeper and I want to make sure I use the correct one. Love your site. Made one of your chicken recipes yesterday and it was delish. Ash from Canada.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Ash. My dish is about 7 inches by 11 inches, and about 2 inches deep. It worked well! I think I nine inch square dish would also work. Thanks for your nice words!

      Delete

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